The Pilgrim’s Progress

by John Bunyan

Originally published in 1678

One of the most widely read books of all time, this adventure reveals John Bunyan’s intense grasp of the Scriptures. Penned while in prison for refusing to compromise the gospel, The Pilgrim’s Progress is a guide for the journey from death to life. The times have changed, but the landmarks and adversaries are very much the same.

The Pilgrim’s Progress is a call to the high stakes of every Christian’s journey. Don’t pick it up expecting quaint amusement; it is a story of the undeniable truth, great cost, and overwhelming joy of the gospel.

To purchase, click here: The Pilgrim’s Progress by John Bunyan

 

Pilgrim’s Progress

  • p13 – “I dreamed, and behold I saw a man clothed with rags standing in a certain place, with his face from his own house, a Book in his hand, and a great burden upon his back. I looked, and saw him open the Book and read therein; and as he read he wept and trembled; and, not being able longer to contain, he break out with a lamentable cry, saying, ‘What shall I do?'”
  • p17 – “You dwell in the city of Destruction, the place also where I was born: I see it to be so; and dying there, sooner or later you will sink lower than the grave, into a place that burns with fire and brimstone. Be content, good neighbors, and go along with me!”
  • p18 – “I seek an inheritance incorruptible, undefiled, and that fadeth not away; and it is laid up in Heaven, and safe there, to be bestowed, at the time appointed, on them that diligently seek it. Read it so, if you will, in my Book.”
  • p18 – “If you believe not me, read here in this Book; and for the truth of what is expressed therein, behold all is confirmed by the blood of Him that made it.”
  • p26 – “…Thou art like to meet with, in the way which thou goest, wearisome, painfulness, hunger, perils, nakedness, sword, lions, dragons, darkness, and (in a word) death, and what not. These things are certainly true, having been confirmed by many testimonies.”
  • p31 – “See that ye refuse not Him that speaketh. For if they escaped not who refused Him that spake on earth, much more shall not we escape, if we turn away from Him that speaketh from Heaven. Moreover, ‘Now the just shall live by faith; but if any man draw back, my soul shall have no pleasure in him’. He also did thus apply them: Thou art the man that art running into misery; thou hast begun to reject the counsel of the Most High, and to draw back thy foot from the way of peace, even almost to the hazarding of thy perdition.”
  • p32 – “I will now show thee who it was that deluded thee, and who it was also to whom he sent thee. That man that met thee is one Worldly Wiseman; and rightly is he so called; partly because he savoreth only of the doctrine of this world, (therefore he always goes to the town of Morality to church); and partly because he loveth that doctrine best, for it saveth him from the cross; and because he is of this carnal temper, therefore he seeketh to pervert my ways, though right.”
  • p33 – “Besides, the King of glory hath told thee that he that will save his life shall lose it. And he that comes after Him, and hates not his father, and mother, and wife, and childred, and brethren, and sisters, yea, and his own life also, he cannot be His disciple.”
  • p34 – “Believe me, there is nothing in all this noise that thou hast heard of these sottish men, but a design to beguile thee of thy salvation, by turning thee from the way in which I had set thee.”
  • p35 – “May I now enter here? Will he within
    • Open to sorry me, though I have been
    • An undeserving rebel? Then shall I
    • Not fail to sing His lasting praise on high.”
  • p37 – “Alas, poor man, is the celestial glory of so little esteem with him that he counteth it not worth running the hazard of a few difficulties to obtain it?”
  • p39 – “That is the way thou must go. It was cast up by the patriarchs, prophets, Christ and His apostles, and it is as straight as a rule can make it: this is the way thou must go.”
  • p39 – “As to thy burden, be content to bear it until thou comest to the place of deliverance; for there it will fall from thy back of itself.”
  • p41 – “And whereas thou seest the world as cast behind him, and that a crown hangs over his head; that is to show thee that slighting and despising things that are present, for the love that he hath to his Master’s service, he is sure in the world that comes next to have glory for his reward.”
  • p51 – “The Comforter be always with thee, good Christian, to guide thee in the way that leads to the city.”
  • p52 – “He hath given me rest by His sorrows and life by His death.”
  • p52 – “Thus far did I come laden with my sin;
    • Nor could aught ease the grief that I was in,
    • Till I came hither: what a place is this!
    • Must here be the beginning of my bliss?
    • Must here the burden fall from off my back?
    • Must here, the strings that bound it to me crack?
    • Blest cross! blest sepulcher! blest rather be
    • The Man that there was put to shame for me!
  • p55 – “I walk by the rule of my Master–you walk by the rude working of your fancies. You are counted thieves already by the Lord of the way; therefore I doubt you will not be found true men at the end of the way. You come in by yourselves without His direction, and shall go out by yourselves without His mercy.”
  • p56 – “Surely, think I, when I come to the gate of the city, the Lord thereof will know me for good, since I have His coat on my back; a coat that He gave me freely in the day that He stripped me of my rags.”
  • p57 – “The hill, though high, I cover to ascend,
    • The difficulty will not me offend;
    • For I perceive the way to life lies here:
    • Come, pluck up, heart, let’s neither faint nor fear.
    • Better, though difficult, the right way to go,
    • Than wrong, though easy, where the end is woe.”
  • p59 – “To go back is nothing but death; to go forward is fear of death, and life everlasting beyond it: I will yet go forward.”
  • p66 – “Why, I went but a little further, and I saw One, as I thought in my mind, hang bleeding upon a tree; and the very sight of Him made my burden fall off my back; for I groaned under a very heavy burden; but then it fell down from off me. It was a strange thing to me, for I never saw such a thing before; yea, and while I stood looking up (for then I could not forbear looking), three Shining Ones came to me. One of them testified that my sins were forgiven me; another stripped me of my rags, and gave me this broidered coat which you see; and the third set the mark which you see in my forehead, and gave me this sealed roll.”
  • p67 – “Can you remember by what means you find your annoyances at times as if they were vanquished? Yes; when I think what I saw at the cross, that will do it; and when I look upon my broidered coat, that will do it; also when I look into the toll that I carry in my bosom, that will do it; and when my thoughts wax warm about whither I am going, that will do it.”
  • p68 – “Why, there I hope to see Him alive that did hang dead on the cross. There I hope to be rid of all those things that to this day are in me an annoyance to me. There they say there is no death. There I shall dwell with such company as I like best. For, to tell you the truth, I love Him because I was by Him eased of my burden, and I am weary of my inward sickness. I would fain be when I shall die no more, and with the company that shall continually cry, Holy, holy, holy.”
  • p71 – “…He had stripped Himself of His glory that He might do this for the poor…He had made many pilgrims princes, though by nature they were beggars born, and their original had been the dunghill.”
  • p86 – “Christian was so confounded that he did not know his own voice…one of the wicked ones got behind him and stepped up softly on him, and whisperingly suggested many grievous blasphemies to him, which he verily thought had proceeded from his own mind.”
  • p88 – “O world of wonders (I can say no less),
    •   That I should be preserved in that distress
    •   That I have met with here! Oh, blessed be
    •   That hand that from it hath deliver’d me!
    •   Dangers in darkness, devils, Hell, and sin,
    •   Did compass me while I this vale was in;
    •   Yea, snares, and pits, and traps, and nets did lie
    •   My path about, that worthless, silly I
    •   Might have been caught, entangled, and cast down:
    •   But since I live, let Jesus wear the crown!”
  • p98 – “And I thought, moreover, that at the day of doom we shall not be doomed to death or life according to the hectoring spirits of the world, but according to the wisdom and law of the Highest. Therefore, thought I, what God says is best, is best though all the men in the world are against it. Seeing, then, that God prefers His religion; seeing God prefers a tender conscience; seeing they that make themselves fools for the kingdom of Heaven are wisest, and that the poor man that loveth Christ is richer than the greatest man in the world that hates Him: Shame, depart, thou art an enemy to my salvation.”
  • p100 – “I think we must cry to Him for help against Shame, that would have us to be valiant for truth upon the earth.”
  • p101 – “That is, indeed, a thing to be lamented; for what thing so worthy of the use of the tongue and mouth of men on earth, as are the things of the God of Heaven?”
  • p101 – “…What thing so pleasant, and what so profitable, as to talk of the things of God? What things so pleasant? That is, if a man hath any delight in things that are wonderful. For instance: if a man doth delight to talk of the history, or the mystery of things; or if a man doth love to talk of miracles, wonders, or signs, where shall he find things recorded so delightfully and so sweetly penned as in the Holy Scripture?”
  • p102 – “…heavenly knowledge of these is the gift of God; no man attaineth to them by human industry…”
  • p105 – “[Saying and doing] are two things indeed, and are as diverse as are the soul and the body; for as the body without the soul is but a dead carcass, so saying, if it be alone, is but a dead carcass also.”
  • p106 – “It will not be said then, ‘Did you believe?’ but, ‘Were you doers, or talkers only?'”
  • p111 – “And doth your life and conversation testify the same; or standeth your religion in word or tongue and not in deed and truth? Pray, if you incline to answer me in this, say no more than you know the God above will say Amen to, and also nothing but what your conscience can justify you in; for not he that commendeth himself is approved, but who the Lord commendeth.”
  • p113 – “There is but little of this faithful dealing with men nowadays, and that makes religion to stink in the nostrils of so many as it doth: for they are these talkative fools, whose religion is only in word, and are debauched and vain in their conversation, that (being so much admitted into the fellowship of the godly) do puzzle the world, blemish Christianity, and grieve the sincere.”
  • p114 – “Welcome, welcome, my good Evangelist; the sight of thy countenance brings to my remembrance thy ancient kindness and unwearied labors for my eternal good.”
  • p126 – “…that what rule, or laws, or custom, or people were flat against the Word of God are diametrically opposite to Christianity.”
  • p126 – “…that in the worship of God there is required a divine faith; but there can be no divine faith without a divine revelation of the will of God. Therefore, whatever is thrust into the worship of God that is not agreeable to divine revelation cannot be done but by a human faith, which faith will not be profitable to eternal life.”
  • p129 – “Well, Faithful, thou has faithfully professed,
    •     Unto thy Lord, with whom thou shalt be blest,
    •     When faithless ones, with all their vain delights,
    •     Are crying out under their hellish plights;
    •     Sing, Faithful, sing, and let thy name survive;
    •     For though they killed thee, thou art yet alive.”
  • p133 – “If you will go with us you must go against wind and tide; the which, I perceive, is against your opinion. You must also own Religion in his rags, as well as when in his silver slippers; and stand by him, too, when bound in irons, as well as when he walketh the streets with applause.”
  • p141 – “If these men cannot stand before the sentence of men, what will they do with the sentence of God? And if they are mute when dealt with by vessels of clay, what will they do when they shall be rebuked by the flames of a devouring fire?”
  • p162 – “This is a by-way to Hell, a way that hypocrites go in at; namely, such as sell their birthright, with Esau; such as sell their Master, with Judas; such as blaspheme the Gospel, with Alexander; and that lie and dissemble, with Ananias and Sapphira his wife.”
  • p163 – “Thus by the Shepherds secret are reveal’d,
    •    Which from all other men are kept conceal’d:
    •    Come to the Shepherds, then, if you would see
    •    Things deep, things hid, and that mysterious be.
  • p166 – “Let Ignorance a little while now muse
    •     On what is said, and let him not refuse
    •     Good counsel to embrace, lest he remain
    •     Still ignorant of what’s the chiefest gain.
    •     God saith, those that no understanding have
    •     (Although He made them), them He will not save.
  • p186 – “If a man runs a hundred pounds into the storekeeper’s debt, and after that shall pay for all that he shall fetch; yet if his old debt stand still in the book uncrossed, the storekeeper may sue him for it, and cast him into prison till he shall pay the debt.”
  • p186 – “Why, I thought thus with myself; I have by my sins run a great way into God’s Book, and my now reforming will not pay off that score. Therefore, I should think still, under all my present amendments, but how shall I be freed from that damnation that I brought myself in danger of by my former transgressions?”
  • p187 – “Another thing that hath troubled me ever since my late amendment is that if I look narrowly into the best of what I do now, I still see sin, new sin mixing itself with the best of that I do; so that now I am forced to conclude that notwithstanding my former fond conceits of myself and duties, I have committed sin enough in one day to send me to Hell, though my former life had been faultless.”
  • p187 – “…unless I could obtain righteousness of a Man that never had sinned, neither mine own nor all the righteousness of the world could save me.”
  • p187 – “Had he told me so when I was pleased and satisfied with mine own amendments, I had called him fool for his pains; but now, since I see mine own infirmity, and the sin which cleaves to my best performance, I have been forced to be of his opinion.”
  • p188 – “I asked him further how that Man’s righteousness could be of that efficacy to justify another before God. And he told me He was the mighty God, and did what He did, and died the death also, not for Himself, but for me; to whom His doings and the worthiness of them should be imputed, if I believed on Him.”
  • p189 – “God be merciful to me a sinner, and make me to know and believe in Jesus Christ; for I see, that if His righteousness had not been, or I have not faith in that righteousness, I am utterly cast away. Lord, I have heard that thou art a merciful God, and hast ordained that Thy Son Jesus Christ should be the Saviour of the world; and, moreover, that Thou art willing to bestow Him upon such a poor sinner as I am. And I am a sinner indeed. Lord, take therefore this opportunity, and magnify Thy grace in the salvation of my soul, through Thy Son Jesus Christ. Amen.”
  • p190 – “I believed that it was true which hath been told me, to wit, that without the righteousness of this Christ, all the world could not save me; and therefore, thought I with myself if I leave off, I die, and I can but die at the throne of grace.”
  • p191 – “Then the water stood in mine eyes, and I asked further: ‘But, Lord, may such a great sinner as I am be indeed accepted of Thee, and be saved by Thee?’ And I heard Him say: ‘Him that cometh to me, I will in no wise cast out’.
  • 192 – “It made me see that all the world, notwithstanding all the righteousness thereof, is in a state of condemnation. It made me see that God the Father, though He be just, can justly justify the coming sinner. It made me greatly ashamed of the vileness of my former life, and confounded me with the sense of mine own ignorance; for there never came thought into my heart before now that showed me so the beauty of Jesus Christ. It made me love a holy life, and long to do something for the honor and glory of the name of the Lord Jesus. Yea, I thought that had I now a thousand gallons of blood in my body I could spill it all for the sake of the Lord Jesus.”
  • p193 – “How stand it between God and your soul now?”
    •    “I hope, well: for I am always full of good notions, that come into my mind to comfort me as I walk.”
    •    “What good notions? Pray tell us.”
    •    “Why, I think of God and Heaven.”
    •    “So do the devils and damned souls.”
    •    “But I think of them, and desire them.
    •    “So do many that are never like to come there.”
  • p194 – “‘Ask my fellow if I be a thief.’ Thy heart tells thee so! Except the Word of God beareth witness in this matter, other testimony is of no value.”
  • p194 – “Yes, that is a good heart that hath good thoughts, and that is a good life that is according to God’s commandments; but it is one thing indeed to have these, and another thing only to think so.”
  • p196 – “But to speak of Him with reference to us, then have we right thoughts of God when we think that He knows us better than we know ourselves, and can see sin in us when and where we can see none in ourselves; when we think He knows our inmost thoughts, and that our heart with all its depths is always open unto His eyes; also when we think that all our righteousness stinks in His nostrils, and that therefore He cannot abide to see us stand before Him in any confidence, even of all our best performances.”
  • p197 – “How! Think thou must believe in Christ, when thou seest not thy need of Him! Thou neither seest thy original nor actual infirmities; but hast such an opinion of thyself, and of what thou doest, as plainly renders thee to be one that did never see a necessity of Christ’s personal righteousness to justify thee before God. How, then, dost thou say, I believe in Christ?”
  • p197 – “1. Thou believest with a fantastical faith; for this faith is nowhere described in the Word.
    •     2. Thou believest with a false faith; because it taketh justification from the personal righteousness of Christ, and applies it to thy own.
    •     3. This faith maketh not Christ a justifier of thy person, but of thy actions; and of thy person, for thy action’s sake, which is false.
    •     4. Therefore this faith is deceitful, even such as will leave thee under wrath in the day of God Almighty: for true justifying faith puts the soul, as sensible of its lost condition by the law, upon flying for refuge unto Christ’s righteousness (which righteousness of His is not an act of grace by which He maketh, for justification, thy obedience accepted with God, but His personal obedience to the law, in doing and suffering for us what that require at our hands); this righteousness, I say true faith accepteth; under the skirt of which the soul being shrouded, and by it presented as spotless before God, it is accepted, and acquitted from condemnation.”
  • p198 – “Ignorant thou art of what justifying righteousness is, and as ignorant how to secure thy soul through the faith of it, from the heavy wrath of God. Yea, thou also art ignorant of the true effects of saving faith in this righteousness of Christ, which is to bow and win over the heart to God in Christ, to love His name, His Word, ways, and people, and not as thou ignorantly imaginest.”
  • p199 – “Christ is so hid in God from the natural apprehensions of all flesh that He cannot by any man be savingly known, unless God the Father reveals Him to him.”
  • p199 – “You ought not so slightly speak of this matter; for I will boldly affirm, that no man can know Jesus Christ but by the revelation of the Father. Yea, and faith too, by which the soul layeth hold upon Christ, must be wrought by the exceeding greatness of His mighty power…”
  • p200 – “Then I say, sometimes (as I think) they may; but they being naturally ignorant, understand not that such convictions tend to their good; and therefore they do desperately seek to stifle them, and presumptuously continue to flatter themselves in the way of their own hearts.”
  • p200 – “I do believe, as you say, that fear tends much to men’s good, and to make them right at their beginning to go on pilgrimage.”
  • p201 – “True or right fear is discovered by three things:
    •     1. By its rise: it is caused by saving convictions for sin.
    •     2. It driveth the soul to lay fast hold of Christ for salvation.
    •     3. It begetteth and continueth in the soul a great reverence of God, His Word, and ways, keeping it tender, and making it afraid to turn from them, to the right hand or to the left, to anything that may dishonor God, break its peace, grieve the Spirit, or cause the enemy to speak reproachfully.
  • p201 – “How do they seek to stifle [their convictions]?
    •     1. They think that those fears are wrought by the Devil (though indeed they are wrought of God); and, thinking so, they resist them, as things that directly tend to their overthrow.
    •     2. They also think that these fears tend to the spoiling of their faith; when, alas for them, poor men that they are, they have none at all! And therefore they harden their hearts against them.
    •     3. They presume they ought not to fear, and therefore, in despite of them, wax presumptuously confident.
    •     4. They see that those fears tend to take away from them their pitiful old self-holiness, and therefore they resist them with all their might.
  • p203 – “Well, then, there are, in my judgment, four reasons for [backsliding]:
    •     1. Though the consciences of such men are awakened, yet their minds are not changed. Being hot for Heaven by virtue only of the sense and fear of the torments of Hell, as their sense of Hell and fear of damnation chills and cools, so their desires for Heaven and salvation cool also. So then it comes to pass that when their guilt and fear are gone, their desires for Heaven and happiness die, and they return to their course again.
    •     2. Another reason is, they have slavish fears that do overmaster them: I speak now of the fears that they have of men: “For fear of man bringeth a snare”.
    •     3. The shame that attends religion lies also as a block in their way. They are proud and haughty, and religion in their eye is low and contemptible. Therefore, when they have lost their sense of Hell and the wrath to come, they return again to their former course.
    •     4. Guilt, and to mediate terror, are grievous to them. They like not to see their misery before they come into it; though perhaps the sight of it first, if they loved that sight, might make them flee whither the righteous flee, and are safe; but because they do, as I hinted before, even shun the thoughts of guilt and terror, therefore, when once they are rid of their awakenings about the terrors and wrath of God; they harden their hearts gladly, and choose such ways as will harden them more and more.
  • p204 – “And therefore they are but like the felon that standeth before the judge: he quakes and trembles, and seems to repent most heartily, but the bottom of all is the fear of the halter; not of any detestation of the offense, as is evident; because let but this man have his liberty, and he will be a thief, and so a rouge still; whereas, if his mind was changed, he would be otherwise.”
  • p205 – “So I will willingly [show you the manner of their backslidings].
    •     1. They draw off their thoughts, all that they may, from the remembrance of God, death, and judgment to come.
    •     2. Then they cast off by degrees private duties, as closet prayers, curbing their lusts, watching sorrow for sin, and the like.
    •     3. Then they shun the company of lively and warm Christians.
    •     4. After that, they grow cold to public duty; as hearing, reading, godly conference, and the like.
    •     5. They then begin to pick holes, as we say, in the coats of some of the godly, and that devilishly, that they may have a seeming color to throw religion (for the sake of some infirmities they have espied in them) behind their backs.
    •     6. Then they begin to adhere to, and associate themselves with carnal, loose, and wanton men.
    •     7. Then they give way to carnal and wanton discourses in secret; and glad are they if they can see such things in any that are counted honest, that they may the more boldly do it through their example.
    •     8. After this they begin to play with little sins openly.
    •     9. And then, being hardened, they show themselves as they are. Thus being launched again into the gulf of misery, unless a miracle of grace prevent it, they everlastingly perish in their own deceivings.
  • p207 – “Whose godly vineyards and gardens are these? They are the King’s, and are planted here for His own delights, and also for the solace of pilgrims.”
  • p209 – “Yes; but there hath not any, save two, to wit, Enoch and Elijah, been permitted to tread that path since the foundation of the world, nor shall until the last trumpet shall sound.”
  • p211 – “These troubles and distresses that you go through in these waters are no sign that God hath forsaken you; but are sent to try you whether you will call to mind that which heretofore you have received if His goodness, and live upon Him in your distresses.”
  • p211 – “Be of good cheer; Jesus Christ maketh thee whole”.
  • p212 – “There is the Mount Zion, the heavenly Jerusalem, the innumerable company of angels, and the spirits of just men made perfect. You are going now to the Paradise of God wherein you shall see the Tree of Life, and eat of the never-fading fruits thereof: and when you come there, you shall have white robes given you, and your walk and talk shall be every day with the King, even all the days of eternity.”
  • p213 – “You are going now to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob, and to the prophets, men that God hath taken away from the evil to come, and that are now ‘resting upon their beds, each one walking in his righteousness.'”
  • p213 – “To whom it was answered, you must there receive the comfort of all your toil, and have joy for all your sorrow; you must reap what you have sown, even the fruit of all your prayers, and tears, and sufferings for the King by the way. In that place you must wear crowns of gold and enjoy the perpetual sight and visions of the Holy One, for ‘there you shall see him as he is’. There also you shall serve Him continually with praise, with shouting, and thanksgiving, whom you desired to serve in the world, though with much difficulty, because of the infirmity of your flesh. There your eyes shall be delighted with seeing, and your ears with hearing the pleasant voice of the Mighty One. There you shall enjoy your friends again that are gone thither before you, and there you shall with joy receive even everyone that follows into the holy place after you. There also you shall be clothed with glory and majesty, and put into an equipage fit to ride out with the King of Glory. When He shall come with sound of trumpet in the clouds, as upon the wings of the wind, you shall come with Him; and when He shall sit upon the throne of judgment, you shall sit by Him; yea, and when He shall pass sentence upon all the workers of iniquity, let them be angels or men, you also shall have a voice in that judgment, because they were His and your enemies. Also when He shall again return to the City, you shall go too with sound of trumpet, and be ever with Him.”
  • p214 – “These are the men that have loved our Lord, when they were in the world, and that have left all for His holy name; and He hath sent us to fetch them, and we have brought them thus far, on their desired journey, that they may go in and look their Redeemer in the face with joy.”
  • p215 – “But above all, the warm and joyful thoughts that they had about their own dwelling there with such company, and that forever and ever; oh, by what tongue or pen can their glorious joy be expressed!”
  • p216 – “These pilgrims are come from the city of Destruction, for the love that they bear to the King of this place.”
  • p218 – “‘I have ate and drank in the presence of the King and He has taught in our streets.’ Then they asked him for his certificate, that they might go in and show it to the King. So he fumbled in his bosom for one and found none…But the man answered never a word. So they told the King, but He would not come down to see him…Then I saw that there was a way to Hell, even from the gate of Heaven, as well as from the city of Destruction.”